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How to prepare myself collecting the required input data?

Start by getting familiar with our products

“The proof of the pudding is in the eating”

Therefore, our advice is to simply start-up module M1 to perform a test run to experience the ease of use and become familiar with the application methodology.

All it takes is a couple of minutes of your time to run the application and don’t worry about the input for any numerical input will do.

An input summary will be presented after the final input file is completed and if you are not interested in the outcome you can abort the application at this point.

If you are interested in the outcome and curious how the passenger terminal of the selected airport performs please continue and make corrections until you are satisfied and press submit to obtain your results.

You will be pleased to see the output table colours green, showing that the terminal performs well. Please come back a next time using our services.

If you are interested how well the terminal performs and how much spare capacity is available, you need to run module M2 or M3.

The same applies if the output table colours red indicating that the terminal is underperforming.

Our advice is to follow the same approach starting-up module M2 or M3 to perform a test run to get familiar with the application methodology and to get an idea of the additional input required. You will notice that the structure of all applications are quite similar.

Client support

Airport Consultancy International recognizes that promotion of its novelty to the airport community is of key importance for the adoption of online applications by clients.

Airport Consultancy International is prepared to go the extra mile in being a reliable partner.

Please don’t hesitate to send your request for support using the contact form or mail direct to: info@airportconsultancy.com and we will perform the job together.

Collection of airport data

Airport Consultancy International has introduced a novelty with respect to client / consultant interaction by abandoning the beaten track of the conventional consultancy practice. Site visits to perform data collection are no longer required saving time and costs.

Our experience is that all data required to run the applications is embedded within the airport organization and readily available for collection.

One of the premises behind this interactive web application is that airport and airline management and staff are professionals and specialists in their line of work and are aware of all the ins and outs of the daily operations and know best what is going on at the airport.

The methodology of the applications shows four steps. Below, the collection of airport data is explained step by step.

Note: Module M1 only requires the first 3 steps to be completed.

Airport data collection

Step 1 - overall airport characteristics

Start with the collection of the overall airport characteristics.

Question 1:

What type of traffic is handled at the airport; domestic, international or mixed traffic?

Note: If the airport has multiple terminals consider each terminal separately!

Question 2:

In case of mixed traffic; what is the percentage of domestic passengers in the departure peak hour and the arrival peak hour?

Question 3:

In case the airport handles a mix of narrow body and wide body aircraft; What is the percentage of narrow body aircraft types B, C and D in the arrival peak hour? 

Step 2 – peak hour passenger volumes

Most important is to assess the volume of departing and arriving passengers in a rolling peak hour.

These volumes can be retrieved by using recently published airport traffic forecasts or assessments on basis of airport statistics, tower log information, airport operations information, flight schedules or recent surveys.

Peak hour volumes are required to perform calculations and of key importance for the reliability of the outcome results.

Closely related to the peak hour passenger volumes are the number of well-wishers and welcomers per passenger.

Question 4:

What are the expected number of departing passengers reporting at landside of the terminal within a time frame of 60 minutes (rolling hour)?

Determination of the departure design peak hour volume is explained in the Annex Step 2- peak hour passenger volumes.

Question 5:

What are the expected number of arriving passengers reporting at airside of the terminal within a time frame of 60 minutes (rolling hour)?

Determination of the arrival design peak hour volume is explained in the Annex Step 2- peak hour passenger volumes.

Question 6: - (only applicable for module M3)

What are the expected number of well-wishers seeing passengers off and the welcomers meeting passengers at arrival?

Determination of number of well-wishers and welcomers per passenger is explained in the Annex Step 2- peak hour passenger volumes.

Step 3 – available terminal equipment

Make an inventory of the passenger processing areas present in the terminal building and write down the number of available handling equipment. This information will be used for comparison with equipment calculations and to monitor the terminal performance.

An easy way of producing an equipment inventory list yourself is explained in Annex step 3 - available terminal equipment.

Important observations:

  • the equipment should be 100% available for processing passengers;
  • calculations are based on CUTE and is excluding surplus equipment accounting for first& business class, special handling, out of order, etc.

Question 7:

Which passenger processing areas can you identify in the departure flow and arrival flow?

Question 8:

How much handling equipment is available at each processing area?

Question 9:

What is the total available presentation length of the baggage reclaim devices for reclaiming baggage subdivided in:

short haul or domestic or mainly narrow body aircraft types B, C and D?

long haul or international or mainly wide body aircraft types E and F?

Step 4 - available waiting- and circulation areas

Take measurements of the available waiting- and circulation areas currently present in the terminal and calculate the floor areas. The measurements can be retrieved from drawings available at the airport maintenance department or by actually measuring the spaces.

It is our pleasure to assist you taking the correct measurements.

Please don’t hesitate to send your request for support using the contact form or mail direct to: info@airportconsultancy.com and we will perform the job together.

An easy way of producing an inventory list of the areas yourself is explained in Annex step 4 - available waiting- and circulation areas.

Question 7: - (only applicable for modules M2 and M3)

Which of the following waiting & circulation areas can you identify in the departure flow and arrival flow?

  • Well-wishers hall;
  • Domestic waiting lounges;
  • International waiting lounge;
  • Airline lounges;
  • Welcomers hall.

Annexes

Annex Step 2- peak hour passenger volumes

Determination of the departure design peak hour volume

The design peak hour is equivalent to approximately 80% of the busiest hour of the year.

In terms of operations this means that the terminal will be congested for about 30 to 40 hours of the year which is considered acceptable by the airport industry.

This premise is fuelled by economic drivers balancing CAPEX and OPEX being the basis for planning and design of passenger terminal facilities delivering adequate handling capacity.

The design peak hour for departures is defined as the number of airside enplaning passengers within a 60-minute time frame (rolling hour).

Determination of the landside portion of the departure design peak hour volume.

The landside portion is expressed as a percentage of airside enplaning passengers within a 60-minute time frame (rolling hour) and is ranging between 80% and 99%.

The percentage represent the portion of enplaning passengers reporting at landside for check-in. This percentage is expressed in the report factor.

The exact percentage is hard to calculate for it is airport specific and dependent on the flight schedule and a set of check-in parameters.

The best approach is to make a survey of the passengers entering the building but this is time consuming and can be costly.

A practical approach is to take a flight schedule. No matter if you use the current flight schedule or a constructed flight schedule it is important to take in consideration the effects of the flights of the previous rolling hour.

If check-in is still open for these flights they add-up to the peak hour increasing the percentage.

If there are no flights from the previous rolling hour a report factor of 80% to 85% is acceptable.

If check-in is still open for a portion of flights from the previous hour the report factor easily increases up to 95% or above.

 

Determination of the arrival design peak hour volume

This number is required as input for calculations and can be best determined following the first part of the process as described above. 

The design peak hour is equivalent to approximately 80% of the busiest hour of the year. In terms of operations this means that the terminal will be congested for about 30 to 40 hours of the year which is considered acceptable by the airport industry.

This premise is fuelled by economic drivers balancing CAPEX and OPEX being the basis for planning and design of passenger terminal facilities delivering adequate handling capacity.

The design peak hour for arrivals is defined as the number of airside deplaning passengers within a 60-minute time frame (rolling hour).


Determination of number of well-wishers and welcomers per passenger

The number of well-wishers and welcomers per passenger visiting the airport are airport specific and is of importance for the calculation of landside functional and space requirements. The number of well-wishers and welcomers per passenger can be different for domestic and international passengers.

You will be prompted for input of departing passengers and well-wishers and arriving passengers and welcomers resulting in a factor used for calculations.

For example:

Departing passenger: 1 and well-wishers seeing off passenger: 5; the result is a factor 5 to 1 equals 5.

Departing passenger: 5 and well-wishers seeing off passenger: 1; the result is a factor 1 to 5 equals 0.2. 

Annex step 3 - available terminal equipment

Equipment inventory

An easy way of producing an equipment inventory list is to go to the web page ACI modules and press the button product sample mentioned under the module of your choice. Fill-in the boxes in the column labelled “current number” (if applicable for the airport in question).

Annex step 4 - available waiting- and circulation areas

Waiting- and circulation area inventory

Follow the same approach as in annex step 3 producing an area inventory list but in this case fill-in the boxes in the same column labelled “current area” (if applicable for the airport in question).

airport consultancy, airport master planning, airport development studies, airport feasibility studies, airport facilities programming, airport facilities sizing, airport concept design, PPP technical structuring, PPP implementation, airport investment studies, airport terminal capacity applications, airport system design interface management

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